Bayou City Blog

BCWK Files Suit Against City of Houston

BCWK Files Suit Against City of Houston

Jordan Macha | September 21, 2018

Bayou City Waterkeeper filed suit against the City of Houston for over 9,300 potential Clean Water Act violations on Friday, 21 September 2018. For at least the last five years, the City has failed to comply with its permits by allowing raw or partially treated sewage to be discharged from its wastewater treatment and collection systems into our public waterways throughout the Houston area.

Houston City Council Passes Floodplain Ordinance

Houston City Council Passes Floodplain Ordinance

Jordan Macha | April 5, 2018

Eight months after Hurricane Harvey, City Council approved a new ordinance, proposed by Mayor Turner to increase elevation requirements for new buildings. Beginning in September 2018, new construction must be built two feet above ground, elevating homes and commercial buildings out of the 500-year floodplain

OP-ED: Ike Dike Needs a Sage Alternative

OP-ED: Ike Dike Needs a Sage Alternative

Jordan Macha | March 25, 2018

While discussions of how to protect our coastal communities on the upper Texas coast is nothing new, the hurricane season of 2017 has strengthened the need and rhetoric around providing protection from ever-increasing storms and its surge impacts. For years, the silver bullet coastal barrier option has centered around the coastal spine — commonly known as the Ike Dike — and what could be one of the costliest public infrastructure projects in U.S. history.

Texas’ Wetland Forests Worth $53.9 billion

Texas’ Wetland Forests Worth $53.9 billion

Jordan Macha | February 28, 2018

The Texas Coast is home to a multitude of wetland varieties, which play an important role in the health of our ecosystem and supports our economy. In a recent report by the Dogwood Alliance, “Treasures of the South: The True Value of Wetland Forests,” it’s estimated that Texas’s wetland forests are worth approximately $53.9 billion […]

A Sage Alternative

A Sage Alternative

Jordan Macha | December 18, 2017

While discussions of how to protect our coastal communities on the Upper Texas Coast is nothing new, the Hurricane Season of 2017 has strengthened the need and rhetoric around providing protection from ever-increasing storms and its surge impacts. For years, the silver bullet coastal barrier option has centered around the coastal spine – commonly known as the Ike Dike – and what could be one of the costliest public infrastructure projects in U.S. history.

Houston’s Zoning

Houston’s Zoning

Jordan Macha | September 15, 2017

Were the impacts of Harvey in Houston a result of no zoning in the city of no limits? Zoning and the lack of zoning have colored discussions about how Houston develops for over a hundred years. Zoning is a veritable lightning rod for animated discussions about development in our city. Zoning has detractors from various sides. There are those who decry any kind of controls on development, and to them zoning would be the absolute worst kind of regulation. On the other hand, zoning has its detractors amongst the new urban cognoscenti, who consider zoning as an impediment to the mixed-use walkability that defines livable cities.

Will Houston Learn from its Mistakes?

Will Houston Learn from its Mistakes?

Jordan Macha | September 13, 2017

Nick Anderson, Pulitzer Prize winning political cartoonist, illustrated a great feature on the importance of wetlands in the face of natural disasters like Harvey — featuring our own John Jacob, Board Chair of Bayou City Waterkeeper!

A Message from the Board: Hurricane Harvey & Bayou City Waterkeeper

A Message from the Board: Hurricane Harvey & Bayou City Waterkeeper

Jordan Macha | September 4, 2017

Hurricane Harvey has hit the Greater Houston area, and the Galveston Bay Watershed, hard. As the waters recede, thousands of people remain evacuated, homes are left destroyed, and at least 50 lives were lost. All this destruction due to the “new normal” – more frequent historic flooding in coastal Texas. We are working to assess the damage the record-breaking storm has brought to the Lower Galveston Bay watershed, supporting local communities, as well as developing a long-term clean-up and water monitoring plan.